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Displaying 1 to 10 of 935

The omnivore's dilemma : a natural history of four meals

by:Pollan, Michael

What should we have for dinner? When you can eat just about anything nature (or the supermarket) has to offer, deciding what you should eat will inevitably stir anxiety, especially when some of the foods might shorten your life. Today, buffeted by one food fad after another, America is suffering from a national eating disorder. As the cornucopia of the modern American supermarket and fast food outlet confronts us with a bewildering and treacherous landscape, what's at stake becomes not only our own and our children's health, but the health of the environment that sustains life on earth. Pollan follows each of the food chains--industrial food, organic or alternative food, and food we forage ourselves--from the source to the final meal, always emphasizing our coevolutionary relationship with the handful of plant and animal species we depend on. The surprising answers Pollan offers have profound political, economic, psychological, and even moral implications for all of us.--From publisher description.

Editions:34  Date:2006 - 2016  Genre(s):Creative nonfiction, Creative nonfiction

Book

Chew on this : everything you don't want to know about fast food

by:Schlosser, Eric

A behind-the-scenes look at the fast food industry.

Editions:21  Date:2006 - 2017  Type:Juvenile  Genre(s):Juvenile works

Book

Everyone eats : understanding food and culture

by:Anderson, E. N., 1941-

Everyone eats, but rarely do we ask why or investigate why we eat what we eat. Why do we love spices, sweets, coffee? How did rice become such a staple food throughout so much of eastern Asia? Everyone Eats examines the social and cultural reasons for our food choices and provides an explanation of the nutritional reasons for why humans eat, resulting in a unique cultural and biological approach to the topic. E.N. Anderson explains the economics of food in the globalization era, food's relationship to religion, medicine, and ethnicity as well as offers suggestions on how to end hunger, starv.

Editions:24  Date:2004 - 2014

Book

Sweetness and power : the place of sugar in modern history

by:Mintz, Sidney W. (Sidney Wilfred), 1922-2015

In thid book the author shows how Europeans and Americans transformed sugar from a rare foreign luxury to a commonplace necessity of modern life, and how it changed the history of capitalism and industry. He discusses the production and consumption of sugar, and reveals how closely interwoven are sugar's origins as a "slave" crop grown in Europe's tropical colonies with its use first as an extravagant luxury for the aristocracy, then as a staple of the diet of the new industrial proletariat. Finally, he considers how sugar has altered work patterns, eating habits, and our diet in modern times.

Editions:62  Date:1985 - 2014  Genre(s):History

Book

Catching fire : how cooking made us human

by:Wrangham, Richard W., 1948-

In this stunningly original book, Richard Wrangham argues that it was cooking that caused the extraordinary transformation of our ancestors from apelike beings to Homo erectus.

Editions:41  Date:1469 - 2012  Genre(s):History

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A history of the world in 6 glasses

by:Standage, Tom

Beer was first made in the Fertile Crescent and by 3000 B.C.E. was so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that it was used to pay wages. In ancient Greece wine became the main export of her vast seaborne trade, helping spread Greek culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying seamen on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Although coffee originated in the Arab world, it stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. And hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it became especially popular in Britain, with far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Finally, though carbonated drinks were invented in 18th-century Europe they became a 20th-century phenomenon, and Coca-Cola in particular is the leading symbol of globalization. For Tom Standage, each drink is a kind of technology, a catalyst for advancing culture by which he demonstrates the intricate interplay of different civilizations. You may never look at your favorite drink the same way again.

Editions:55  Date:2005 - 2015  Genre(s):History

Book

Beyond beef : the rise and fall of the cattle culture

by:Rifkin, Jeremy

Taking us from ancient Sumer to the Dickensian disassembly lines of Chicago's stockyards, Jeremy Rifkin interweaves anthropology, sociology, economics and ecology in a brilliant and scathing examination and indictment of the cattle culture that has come to shape and warp our world. He cuts through the myth of the cowboy to illumine the international intrigue, political giveaways and sheer avarice that transformed the great American frontier into a huge cattle breeding ground.

Editions:30  Date:1992 - 1994  Genre(s):History

Book

Building houses out of chicken legs : Black women, food, and power

by:Williams-Forson, Psyche A.

Chicken--both the bird and the food--has played multiple roles in the lives of African American women from the slavery era to the present. It has provided food and a source of income for their families, shaped a distinctive culture, and helped women define and exert themselves in racist and hostile environments. Psyche A. Williams-Forson examines the complexity of black women's legacies using food as a form of cultural work. While acknowledging the negative interpretations of black culture associated with chicken imagery, Williams-Forson focuses her analysis on the ways black women have forged their own self-definitions and relationships to the "gospel bird." Exploring material ranging from personal interviews to the comedy of Chris Rock, from commercial advertisements to the art of Kara Walker, and from cookbooks to literature, Williams-Forson considers how black women arrive at degrees of self-definition and self-reliance using certain foods. She demonstrates how they defy conventional representations of blackness and exercise influence through food preparation and distribution. Understanding these complex relationships clarifies how present associations of blacks and chicken are rooted in a past that is fraught with both racism and agency. The traditions and practices of feminism, Williams-Forson argues, are inherent in the foods women prepare and serve.

Editions:9  Date:2006 - 2007

Book

Tastes of paradise : a social history of spices, stimulants, and intoxicants

by:Schivelbusch, Wolfgang, 1941-

Array, an anecdotal history of ideas and beliefs, of fashions, fads, and rituals that orders a treasury of unknown facts in a new way to give us a fresh perspective on our own past and on our present.

Editions:83  Date:1977 - 2012

Book

Educated tastes : food, drink, and connoisseur culture

by:Strong, Jeremy

"The old adage 'you are what you eat' has never seemed more true than in this era, when ethics, politics, and the environment figure so prominently in what we ingest and in what we think about it. Then there are connoisseurs, whose approaches to food address 'good taste' and frequently require a language that encompasses cultural and social dimensions as well. From the highs (and lows) of connoisseurship to the frustrations and rewards of a mother encouraging her child to eat, the essays in this volume explore the complex and infinitely varied ways in which food matters to all of us. Educated Tastes is a collection of new essays that examine how taste is learned, developed, and represented. It spans such diverse topics as teaching wine tasting, food in Don Quixote, Soviet cookbooks, cruel foods, and the lambic beers of the Belgian Payottenland. A set of key themes connect these topics: the relationships between taste and place; how our knowledge of food shapes taste experiences; how gustatory discrimination functions as a marker of social difference; and the place of ethical, environmental, and political concerns in debates around the importance and meaning of taste. With essays that address, variously, the connections between food, drink, and music; the place of food in the development of Italian nationhood; and the role of morality in aesthetic judgment, Educated Tastes offers a fresh look at food in history, society, and culture"--Provided by publisher.

Editions:10  Date:2011

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 935