WorldCat Cookbook FinderCookbook Finder

Explore cookbooks and more from libraries around the world.

Search

Search Title, Title by Author, ISBN or OCLC #

Current Search

Genres & Subject
  • History

Narrow Your Results

Format

Audience Level

Content

Genre

Decade published

Search Results

Displaying 1 to 10 of 9604

Food in history

by:Tannahill, Reay

Surveys the evolution of man's diverse gastronomic habits, customs, and traditions against their cultural and historical background.

Editions:97  Date:1973 - 2014  Genre(s):History

Book

Kitchen confidential : adventures in the culinary underbelly

by:Bourdain, Anthony

A New York City chef who is also a novelist recounts his experiences in the restaurant business, and exposes abuses of power, sexual promiscuity, drug use, and other secrets of life behind kitchen doors.

Editions:136  Date:2000 - 2015  Genre(s):Biography, Autobiographies, Autobiographies, Humorous fiction, History

Book

Meals to come : a history of the future of food

by:Belasco, Warren James

In this provocative and lively addition to his acclaimed writings on food, Warren Belasco takes a sweeping look at a little-explored yet timely topic: humanity's deep-rooted anxiety about the future of food. People have expressed their worries about the future of the food supply in myriad ways, and here Belasco explores a fascinating array of material ranging over two hundred years--from futuristic novels and films to world's fairs, Disney amusement parks, supermarket and restaurant architecture, organic farmers' markets, debates over genetic engineering, and more. Placing food issues in this deep historical context, he provides an innovative framework for understanding the future of food today--when new prophets warn us against complacency at the same time that new technologies offer promising solutions. But will our grandchildren's grandchildren enjoy the cornucopian bounty most of us take for granted? This first history of the future to put food at the center of the story provides an intriguing perspective on this question for anyone--from general readers to policy analysts, historians, and students of the future--who has wondered about the future of life's most basic requirement.

Editions:12  Date:2006  Genre(s):History

Book

The Japanese way of tea : from its origins in China to Sen Rikyū

by:Sen, Sōshitsu, XV, 1923-

"The author follows tea drinking practices from their arrival in Japan to the time of Rikyu, considering at each stage the relevant historical changes and their significance for the Way of Tea. Shortly after its arrival during the Heian era (794-1185), tea was celebrated by Japanese poets, who attributed the same spiritual qualities to the beverage as had their Chinese contemporaries. During the medieval era, however, tea began to take on a distinctively Japanese character. Eisai (1141-1215), the founder of the Rinzai sect of Japanese Zen Buddhism, accentuated the medicinal aspect of tea and saw it as a means of salvation in a spiritually degenerate age (mappo)."--Jacket.

Editions:22  Date:1983 - 2000  Genre(s):History

Book

A medieval feast

by:Aliki

Describes the preparation and celebration of a medieval feast held at an English manor house entertaining royal guests.

Editions:16  Date:1981 - 2004  Type:Juvenile  Genre(s):History, Juvenile works

Book

Paradox of plenty : a social history of eating in modern America

by:Levenstein, Harvey A., 1938-

America has always been blessed with an abundance of food, but when it comes to the national diet, it is a land of stark contrast and paradox. In the early months of the Depression, for instance, there were 82 breadlines in New York City alone, and food riots broke out in such places as Henryetta, Oklahoma, and England, Arkansas. Yet at the same time, among those who were better-off, absurd weight-loss diets were the rage - the Pineapple-and-Lamb-Chop Diet, the "Mayo Diet" of raw tomatoes and hard-boiled eggs, and even a Coffee-and-Donuts Diet. Why do Americans eat what they eat? And why, in a land of plenty, do so many eat so poorly? In Paradox of Plenty, Harvey Levenstein offers a sweeping social history of food and eating in America, exploring the economic, political, and cultural factors that have shaped the American diet from 1930 to the present. Levenstein begins with the Great Depression, describing the breadlines and the slim-down diets, the era's great communal eating fests - the picnics, barbecues, fish fries, and burgoo feasts - and the wave of "vitamania" which swept the nation before World War II, breeding fears that the national diet was deficient in the so-called "morale vitamin." He discusses wartime food rationing and the attempts of Margaret Mead and other social scientists to change American eating habits, and he examines the postwar "Golden Age of American Food Processing," when Duncan Hines and other industry leaders convinced Americans that they were "the best-fed people on Earth." He depicts the disillusionment of the 1960s, when Americans rediscovered hunger and attacked food processors for denutrifying the food supply, and he shows how President Kennedy helped revive the mystique of French food (and how Julia Child helped demystify it). Finally, he discusses contemporary eating habits, the national obsession with dieting, cholesterolphobia, "natural" foods, the demographics of fast-food chains, and the expanding role of food processors as a source of nutritional information. Both colorful and informative, Paradox of Plenty is the sequel to Levenstein's highly acclaimed Revolution at the Table, which chronicled American eating habits from 1880 to 1930. With this volume he establishes his reputation as the leading historian of the American diet.

Editions:33  Date:1992 - 2010  Genre(s):History

Book

The Little House cookbook : frontier foods from Laura Ingalls Wilder's classic stories

by:Walker, Barbara M. (Barbara Muhs)

Recipes based on the pioneer food written about in the "Little House" books of Laura Ingalls Wilder, along with quotes from the books and descriptions of the food and cooking of pioneer times.

Editions:31  Date:1961 - 2018  Type:Juvenile  Genre(s):History, Juvenile works, Literary cookbooks, Literary cookbooks, Cookbooks

Book

Sweetness and power : the place of sugar in modern history

by:Mintz, Sidney W. (Sidney Wilfred), 1922-2015

In thid book the author shows how Europeans and Americans transformed sugar from a rare foreign luxury to a commonplace necessity of modern life, and how it changed the history of capitalism and industry. He discusses the production and consumption of sugar, and reveals how closely interwoven are sugar's origins as a "slave" crop grown in Europe's tropical colonies with its use first as an extravagant luxury for the aristocracy, then as a staple of the diet of the new industrial proletariat. Finally, he considers how sugar has altered work patterns, eating habits, and our diet in modern times.

Editions:65  Date:1985 - 2014  Genre(s):History

Book

The Cambridge world history of food

by:Kiple, Kenneth F., 1939-2016

"This outstanding work of scholarship explains what we eat and why we eat it. The multidisciplinary articles discuss both individual foods and topcs such as food fads, famine, and eating disorders."--"Outstanding Reference Sources," American Libraries, May 2001.

Editions:28  Date:2000 - 2008  Genre(s):History

Book

Cooking up U.S. history : recipes and research to share with children

by:Barchers, Suzanne I.

Collection of recipes, research, and readings on U.S. history appropriate for elementary students.

Editions:7  Date:1991 - 1999  Type:Juvenile  Genre(s):History, Juvenile works

Book

Displaying 1 to 10 of 9604