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Displaying 11 to 20 of 498

Gastropolis : food and New York City

by:Hauck-Lawson, Annie

"An irresistible sampling of the city's rich food heritage, Gastrapolis explores the personal and historical relationship between New Yorkers and food. Beginning with the origins of cuisine combinations such as Mt. Olympus bagels and Puerto Rican lasagna, the book describes the nature of food and drink before the arrival of Europeans in 1624 and sketches a history of early farming practices. Essays trace the function of place and memory in Asian cuisine, the rise of Jewish food icons, the evolution of food enterprises in Harlem, the relationship between restaurant dining and identity, and the role of peddlers and markets in guiding the ingredients of our meals. They share spice-scented recollections of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx, and present colorful vignettes of the avant-garde chefs, entrepreneurs, and patrons who continue to influence the way New Yorkers eat."--Jacket.

Editions:16  Date:2008 - 2009  Genre(s):History

Book

The most spectacular restaurant in the world : the Twin Towers, Windows on the World, and the rebirth of New York

by:Roston, Tom

The remarkable story of a restaurant on top of the world-built by a legend, destroyed in tragedy-and an era in New York City it helped to frame In the 1970s, New York City was plagued by crime, filth, and an ineffective government. The city was falling apart, and even the newly constructed World Trade Center threatened to be a fiasco. But in April 1976, a quarter-mile up on the 107th floor of the North Tower, a new restaurant called Windows on the World opened its doors-a glittering sign that New York wasn't done just yet. In The Most Spectacular Restaurant in the World, journalist Tom Roston tells the complete history of this incredible restaurant, from its stunning $14-million opening to 9/11 and its tragic end. There are stories of the people behind it, such as Joe Baum, the celebrated restaurateur, who was said to be the only man who could outspend an unlimited budget; the well-tipped waiters; and the cavalcade of famous guests, as well as everyday people celebrating the key moments in their lives. Roston also charts the changes in American food, from baroque and theatrical to locally sourced and organic. Built on nearly 150 original interviews, The Most Spectacular Restaurant in the World is the story of New York City's restaurant culture and the quintessential American drive to succeed.

Editions:4  Date:2019 - 2020  Genre(s):History

Book

Taste of upstate new york : the people and the stories behind 40 food favorites

by:D'Imperio, Chuck

Upstate New York is the birthplace of many of America's favorite foods. The chicken wing was born in a bar in Buffalo, the potato chip originated in the kitchen of a glitzy Saratoga Springs hotel, the salt potato got its start along the marshy shores of a Syracuse lake, and Thousand Island dressing was created in a hotel along the St. Lawrence Seaway. In this book, author Chuck D'Imperio travels across the region to discover the stories and people behind forty iconic foods of Upstate new York. He introduces readers to the black dirt farmers of Orage County who give America its best-tasting onions, to the Catskill Mountains Candy Cane King, and to "Charlie the Butcher," purveyor of the best beef on weck in the state. Filled with color photographs, the book includes a map of the various regions, allowing readers to create their own cultural and historic food tour.

Editions:5  Date:2015  Genre(s):Guidebooks, Anecdotes

Book

Stirrings : how activist New Yorkers ignited a movement for food justice

by:Povitz, Lana Dee

"In the last three decades of the twentieth century, government cutbacks, stagnating wages, AIDS, and gentrification pushed ever more people into poverty, and hunger reached levels unseen since the Depression. In response, New Yorkers set the stage for a nationwide food justice movement. Whether organizing school lunch campaigns, establishing food co-ops, or lobbying city officials, citizen-activists made food a political issue, uniting communities across lines of difference. The charismatic, usually female leaders of these efforts were often products of earlier movements: American communism, civil rights activism, feminism, even Eastern mysticism. Situating food justice within these rich lineages, Lana Dee Povitz demonstrates how grassroots activism continued to thrive, even as it was transformed by unrelenting erosion of the country's already fragile social safety net. Using dozens of new oral histories and archives, Povitz reveals the colorful characters who worked behind the scenes to build and sustain the movement, and illuminates how people worked together to overturn hierarchies rooted in class and race, reorienting the history of food activism as a community-based response to austerity. The first book-length history of food activism in a major American city, Stirrings highlights the emotional, intimate, and interpersonal aspects of social movement culture"--Publisher's description.

Editions:6  Date:2019

Book

The ethnic restaurateur

by:Ray, Krishnendu

Academic discussions of ethnic food have tended to focus on the attitudes of consumers, rather than the creators and producers. In this ground-breaking new book, Krishnendu Ray reverses this trend by exploring the culinary world from the perspective of the ethnic restaurateur. Focusing on New York City, he examines the lived experience, work, memories, and aspirations of immigrants working in the food industry. He shows how migrants become established in new places, creating a taste of home and playing a key role in influencing food cultures as a result of transactions between producers, consumers and commentators. Based on extensive interviews with immigrant restaurateurs and students, chefs and alumni at the Culinary Institute of America, ethnographic observation at immigrant eateries and haute institutional kitchens as well as historical sources such as the US census, newspaper coverage of restaurants, reviews, menus, recipes, and guidebooks, Ray reveals changing tastes in a major American city between the late 19th and through the 20th century. Written by one of the most outstanding scholars in the field, The Ethnic Restaurateur is an essential read for students and academics in food studies, culinary arts, sociology, urban studies and indeed anyone interested in popular culture and cooking in the United States.

Editions:9  Date:2014 - 2020

Book

Stuffed : adventures of a restaurant family

by:Volk, Patricia

Patricia Volk's delicious memoir lets us into her big, crazy, loving, cheerful, infuriating and wonderful family, where you're never just hungry--you're starving to death, and you're never just full--you're stuffed. Volk's family fed New York City for one hundred years, from 1888 when her great-grandfather introduced pastrami to America until 1988, when her father closed his garment center restaurant. All along, food was pretty much at the center of their lives. But as seductively as Volk evokes the food, Stuffed is at heart a paean to her quirky, vibrant relatives: her grandmother with the "best legs in Atlantic City"; her grandfather, who invented the wrecking ball; her larger-than-life father, who sculpted snow thrones when other dads were struggling with snowmen. Writing with freshness and humor, Patricia Volk will leave you hungering to sit down to dinner with her robust family--both for the spectacle and for the food.--From publisher description.

Editions:10  Date:2001 - 2002  Genre(s):Cookbooks, Cookbooks

Book

Feeding Gotham : the Political Economy and Geography of Food in New York, 1790-1860

by:Baics, Gergely

New York City witnessed unparalleled growth in the first half of the nineteenth century, its population rising from thirty thousand people to nearly a million in a matter of decades. Feeding Gotham looks at how America's first metropolis grappled with the challenge of provisioning its inhabitants. It tells the story of how access to food, once a public good, became a private matter left to free and unregulated markets-and of the profound consequences this had for American living standards and urban development. Taking readers from the early republic to the Civil War, Gergely Baics explores the changing dynamics of urban governance, market forces, and the built environment that defined New Yorkers' experiences of supplying their households. He paints a vibrant portrait of the public debates that propelled New York from a tightly regulated public market to a free-market system of provisioning, and shows how deregulation had its social costs and benefits. Baics uses cutting-edge GIS mapping techniques to reconstruct New York's changing food landscapes over half a century, following residents into neighborhood public markets, meat shops, and groceries across the city's expanding territory. He lays bare how unequal access to adequate and healthy food supplies led to an increasingly differentiated urban environment .A masterful blend of economic, social, and geographic history ,Feeding Gotham traces how this highly fragmented geography of food access became a defining and enduring feature of the American city.

Editions:17  Date:2016 - 2018  Genre(s):History

Book

Anthony Bourdain remembered

"A moving and insightful collection of quotes, memories, and images celebrating the life of Anthony Bourdain. When Anthony Bourdain died in June 2018, the outpouring of love from his fans around the world was momentous. The tributes spoke to his legacy: That the world is much smaller than we imagine and people are more alike than they are different. As Bourdain once said, "If I'm an advocate of anything, it's to move ... Walk in someone else's shoes or at least eat their food." Anthony Bourdain Remembered brings together memories and anecdotes from fans reminiscing about Bourdain's unique achievements and his enduring effect on their lives as well as comments from chefs, journalists, filmmakers, musicians, and writers inspired by Bourdain including Barack Obama, Eric Ripert, Jill Filipovic, Ken Burns, Questlove, and José Andrés, among many others. These remembrances give us a glimpse of Tony's widespread impact through his political and social commitments; his dedication to travel and eating well (and widely); and his love of the written word, along with his deep compassion, open-mindedness, and interest in lives different from his own. Anthony Bourdain Remembered captures Bourdain's inimitable spirit and passion in the words of his devoted fans as well as some of his closest friends and colleagues."-- Back cover

Editions:3  Date:2019  Genre(s):Illustrated works, Biographies, Biographies, Illustrated works

Book

Blood, bones, and butter : [the inadvertent education of a reluctant chef]

by:Hamilton, Gabrielle

Hamilton, one of America's most recognized chefs, serves up a sharply crafted and unflinchingly honest memoir about the search for meaning and purpose and the people and places that shaped her journey.

Editions:19  Date:2011 - 2019  Genre(s):Biographies, Biographies

Audiobook

The art of eating in : how I learned to stop spending and love the stove

by:Erway, Cathy

In the city where dining is a sport, a gourmand swears off restaurants (even takeout!) for two years, rediscovering the economical, gastronomical joy of home cooking Gourmand-ista Cathy Erway's timely memoir of quitting restaurants cold turkey speaks to a new era of conscientious eating. An underpaid, twenty-something executive assistant in New York City, she was struggling to make ends meet when she decided to embark on a Walden- esque retreat from the high-priced eateries that drained her wallet. Though she was living in the nation's culinary capital, she decided to swear off all restaurant food. The Art of Eating In chronicles the delectable results of her twenty-four-month experiment, with thirty original recipes included. What began as a way to save money left Erway with a new appreciation for the simple pleasure of sharing a meal with friends at home, the subtleties of home-cooked flavors, and whether her ingredients were ethically grown. She also explored the anti-restaurant underground of supper clubs and cook-offs, and immersed herself in an array of alternative eating lifestyles from freeganism and dumpster-diving to picking tasty greens on a wild edible tour in Brooklyn's Prospect Park. Culminating in a binge that leaves her with a foodie hangover, The Art of Eating In is a journey to savor. Watch a Video.

Editions:7  Date:2010 - 2014  Genre(s):Cookbooks, Cookbooks

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Displaying 11 to 20 of 498