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Displaying 1 to 10 of 4847

Paradox of plenty : a social history of eating in modern America

by:Levenstein, Harvey A., 1938-

America has always been blessed with an abundance of food, but when it comes to the national diet, it is a land of stark contrast and paradox. In the early months of the Depression, for instance, there were 82 breadlines in New York City alone, and food riots broke out in such places as Henryetta, Oklahoma, and England, Arkansas. Yet at the same time, among those who were better-off, absurd weight-loss diets were the rage - the Pineapple-and-Lamb-Chop Diet, the "Mayo Diet" of raw tomatoes and hard-boiled eggs, and even a Coffee-and-Donuts Diet. Why do Americans eat what they eat? And why, in a land of plenty, do so many eat so poorly? In Paradox of Plenty, Harvey Levenstein offers a sweeping social history of food and eating in America, exploring the economic, political, and cultural factors that have shaped the American diet from 1930 to the present. Levenstein begins with the Great Depression, describing the breadlines and the slim-down diets, the era's great communal eating fests - the picnics, barbecues, fish fries, and burgoo feasts - and the wave of "vitamania" which swept the nation before World War II, breeding fears that the national diet was deficient in the so-called "morale vitamin." He discusses wartime food rationing and the attempts of Margaret Mead and other social scientists to change American eating habits, and he examines the postwar "Golden Age of American Food Processing," when Duncan Hines and other industry leaders convinced Americans that they were "the best-fed people on Earth." He depicts the disillusionment of the 1960s, when Americans rediscovered hunger and attacked food processors for denutrifying the food supply, and he shows how President Kennedy helped revive the mystique of French food (and how Julia Child helped demystify it). Finally, he discusses contemporary eating habits, the national obsession with dieting, cholesterolphobia, "natural" foods, the demographics of fast-food chains, and the expanding role of food processors as a source of nutritional information. Both colorful and informative, Paradox of Plenty is the sequel to Levenstein's highly acclaimed Revolution at the Table, which chronicled American eating habits from 1880 to 1930. With this volume he establishes his reputation as the leading historian of the American diet.

Editions:35  Date:1992 - 2010  Genre(s):History

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Kitchen literacy : how we lost knowledge of where food comes from and why we need to get it back

by:Vileisis, Ann

Ask children where food comes from, and they will probably answer: "the supermarket." Ask most adults, and their replies may not be much different. Where our foods are raised and what happens to them between farm and supermarket shelf have become mysteries. How did we become so disconnected from the sources of our breads, beef, cheeses, cereal, apples, and countless other foods that nourish us every day? The answer is a sensory-rich journey through the history of making dinner, as this book takes us from an eighteenth-century garden to today's sleek supermarket aisles, and eventually to farmer's markets that are now enjoying a resurgence. The author chronicles profound changes in how American cooks have considered their foods over two centuries and delivers a powerful statement: what we don't know could hurt us. As the distance between farm and table grew, we went from knowing particular places and specific stories behind our foods' origins to instead relying on advertisers' claims. The woman who raised, plucked, and cooked her own chicken knew its entire life history while today most of us have no idea whether hormones were fed to our poultry. Industrialized eating is undeniably convenient, but it has also created health and environmental problems, including food-borne pathogens, toxic pesticides, and pollution from factory farms. Though the hidden costs of modern meals can be high, it is shown that greater understanding can lead consumers to healthier and more sustainable choices. Revealing how knowledge of our food has been lost and how it might now be regained, this book will make us think differently about what we eat.

Editions:15  Date:2007 - 2010  Genre(s):History

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We are what we eat : ethnic food and the making of Americans

by:Gabaccia, Donna R., 1949-

Ghulam Bombaywala sells bagels in Houston. Demetrios dishes up pizza in Connecticut. The Wangs serve tacos in L.A. How ethnicity has influenced American eating habits - and thus, the make-up and direction of the American cultural mainstream - is the story told in We Are What We Eat. It is a complex tale of ethnic mingling and borrowing, entrepreneurship and connoisseurship, of food as a social and political symbol and weapon - and a thoroughly entertaining history of our culinary tradition of multiculturalism.

Editions:23  Date:1998 - 2009

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Cooking the Mexican way

by:Coronado, Rosa

Introduces fundamentals of Mexican cooking, including special ingredients and cooking utensils. Also provides recipes for suggested dishes.

Editions:18  Date:1982 - 2014  Type:Juvenile  Genre(s):Juvenile works, Cookbooks, Cookbooks

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Italian cuisine : a cultural history

by:Capatti, Alberto, 1944-

"Alberto Capatti and Massimo Montanari uncover a network of culinary customs, food lore, and cooking practices, dating back as far as the Middle Ages, that are identifiably Italian: Italians used forks 300 years before other Europeans, possibly because they were needed to handle pasta, which is slippery and dangerously hot; Italians invented the practice of chilling drinks and may have invented ice cream; Italian culinary practice influenced the rest of Europe to place more emphasis on vegetables and less on meat; and salad was a distinctive aspect of the Italian meal as early as the sixteenth century." "The authors focus on culinary developments in the late medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras, aided by a wealth of cookbooks produced throughout the early modern period. They show how Italy's culinary identities emerged over the course of the centuries through an exchange of information and techniques among geographical regions and social classes. Though temporally, spatially, and socially diverse, these cuisines refer to a common experience that can be described as Italian. Thematically organized around key issues in culinary history and beautifully illustrated, Italian Cuisine is a rich history of the ingredients, dishes, techniques, and social customs behind the Italian food we know and love today."--Jacket.

Editions:14  Date:2003  Genre(s):History, Geschiedenis (vorm), Cookbooks, Cookbooks

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Eating out : social differentiation, consumption, and pleasure

by:Warde, Alan

Eating Out is a fascinating study of the consumption of food outside the home. Through recent in-depth research in English cities, the authors have collected a wealth of information into people's attitudes towards, and expectations of, eating out as a form of entertainment and an expression of taste and status.

Editions:18  Date:2000 - 2009

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Cooking the East African way : revised and expanded to include new low-fat and vegetarian recipes

by:Montgomery, Bertha Vining

An introduction to the cooking of East Africa, featuring basic recipes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner dishes, as well as typical menus.

Editions:31  Date:2001 - 2014  Type:Juvenile  Genre(s):Juvenile works, Literature, Literature

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French lessons : adventures with knife, fork, and corkscrew

by:Mayle, Peter

The author offers a culinary tour of France in search of the perfect country bistro, village market, omelette, and bottle of wine.

Editions:24  Date:2001 - 2003

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Bacchus and civic order : the culture of drink in early modern Germany

by:Tlusty, B. Ann, 1954-

Lining the streets inside the city's gates, clustered in its center, and thinly scattered among its back quarters were Augsburg's taverns and drinking rooms. These institutions ranged from the poorly lit rooms of backstreet wine sellers to the elaborate marble halls frequented by society's most privileged members. Urban drinking rooms provided more than food, drink, and lodging for their guests. They also conferred upon their visitors a sense of social identity commensurate with their status. Like all German cities, Augsburg during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries had a history shaped by the political events attending the Reformation, the post-Reformation, and the Thirty Years' War; its social and political character was also reflected and supported by its public and private drinking rooms. In Bacchus and Civic Order: The Culture of Drink in Early Modern Germany, Ann Tlusty examines the social and cultural functions served by drinking and tavern life in Germany between 1500 and 1700, and challenges existing theories about urban identity, sociability, and power. Through her reconstruction of the social history of Augsburg, from beggars to council members, Tlusty also sheds light on such diverse topics as social ritual, gender and household relations, medical practice, and the concerns of civic leaders with public health and poverty. Drunkenness, dueling, and other forms of tavern comportment that may appear "disorderly" to us today turn out to be the inevitable, even desirable result of a society functioning according to its own rules.

Editions:14  Date:2001 - 2018  Genre(s):History

Book

Food and fantasy in early modern Japan

by:Rath, Eric C., 1967-

How did one dine with a shogun? Or make solid gold soup, sculpt with a fish, or turn seaweed into a symbol of happiness? In this fresh look at Japanese culinary history, Eric Rath delves into the writings of medieval and early modern Japanese chefs to answer these and otehr provocative questions.

Editions:10  Date:2010

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Displaying 1 to 10 of 4847